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Bored with New York City's Art Scene?

It’s July in NYC and I’m bored.

So when I was doom scrolling and saw an open call for art from O’Flahrety’s, an art gallery that could easily pass for a dive bar at 55 Avenue C in NYC I thought what the hell. I gave them a big greasy porcelain jug proclaiming “Up With Finks” on it and a stinky finger on the back, it sort of captures my mood lately. Come down to the opening on July 14th at 8pm for a hot and sweaty time.

If you squint it might actually look like the east village of 1994 when I lived in a squat with five other people just around the corner. Ahh, the good old days.

Graffiti Project 4d (up with finks)Porcelain, glazed, with silkscreen underglaze decal prints, 12.5x4.5x4 inches

Until I see you at the opening

Here is a mixed tape to listen to, so you can hear what I’ve got playing in the studio this month. Enjoy. Listen to the July Mixed Tape

Ad Nauseam

Earlier this week I was interviewed for The Large Glass, an art-talk-show-cocktail-hour. Check out this rambling conversation about life, art and some things I’ve been making in the studio. It was fun.

I adore Janis Joplin

My mom didn’t sing lullaby’s to me as a kid, she played Janis Joplin on the record player, and I am so glad she did. Listening to this version of Summertime led me to a gorgeous poem by the fantastic writer Jericho Brown. Dig this…

"Track 5: Summertime: As performed by Janis Joplin."

God’s got his eye on me, but I ain’t a sparrow. I’m more like a lawn mower . . . no, a chainsaw, Anything that might mangle each manicured lawn In Port Arthur, a place I wouldn’t return to If the mayor offered me every ounce of oil My daddy cans at the refinery. My voice, I mean, Ain’t sweet. Nothing nice about it. It won’t fly Even with Jesus watching. I don’t believe in Jesus. The Baxter boys climbed a tree just to throw Persimmons at me. The good and perfect gifts From above hit like lightning, leave bruises. So I lied—I believe, but I don’t think God Likes me. The girls in the locker room slapped Dirty pads across my face. They called me Bitch, but I never bit back. I ain’t a dog. Chainsaw, I say. My voice hacks at you. I bet I tear my throat. I try so hard to sound jagged. I get high and say one thing so many times Like Willie Baker who worked across the street— Repeated, Please. School out, summertime And the living lashed, Mama said I should be Thankful, that the town’s worse to coloreds Than they are to me, that I’d grow out of my acne. God must love Willie Baker—all that leather and still A please that sounds like music. See. I wouldn’t know a sparrow from a mockingbird. The band plays. I just belt out, Please. This tune Ain’t half the blues. I should be thankful. I get high and moan like a lawn mower So nobody notices I’m such an ugly girl. I’m such an ugly girl. I try to sing like a man Boys call, boy. I turn my face to God. I pray. I wish I could pour oil on everything green in Port Arthur.

Brown, Jericho. "Track 5: Summertime: As performed by Janis Joplin." Callaloo, vol. 32 no. 1, 2009, p. 72-72. Project MUSE, doi:10.1353/cal.0.0298.

In the studio lately

I’ve been working on some new things including some paintings, prints and drawings. Here’s a peak at what’ve been up to lately.

Sketchbook DrawingInk on paper, 16 x 9 inches
Sketchbook DrawingInk on paper, 16 x 9 inches
Vanitas #20 (Ted, Red, Flowers)Silkscreen, on cotton rag paper, 22 x 28 inches, 2022. Edition
Vanitas #19 (Tomtomtom Orange)Silkscreen, on paper, 18 x 39 inches, monoprint © 2022
Vanitas 65, (Stilitano)30 x 22 inches, silkscreen on cotton rag paper, 2022 edition 1/3
Ganymede2022, Oil on canvas, 40 x 32 inches
Mmm GoodOil on canvas, 39.25x31.5 inches, 2021

Andrew on the Large Glass

I'm pleased to share with you that on Tuesday July 5th 2022, at 8pm (eastern standard time) I was invited to join a lively discussion about art, life, and some things I've been working on in the studio. It was hosted live on Twitch, YouTube and Facebook

 To learn more about the show thelargeglass.org

Exhibition: Soniashnyk/Sunflowers

Please join us for an exhibition of artists and makers offering their work for sale in support of Ukrainian Refugees held in conjunction with Open Studios | Ukraine Benefit at The Clemente on Saturday, May 21 from 4-8p and Sunday, May 22, 2022 from 2-6p.

The Soniashnyk/Sunflowers exhibition takes place in Room 406 at The Clemente, located on Manhattan’s Lower East Side 107 Suffolk Street, Studio 406, New York, NY 10002 (Between Rivington & Delancey Streets. Subway: F, M, J, Z to Delancey/Essex)

  

Evoking the sunflower as a symbol of peace and solidarity with the Ukrainian people, Soniashnyk (Ukrainian for ‘sunflowers’) is a group exhibition of ceramics, prints, and paintings organized by The Arts & Crafts Research Studio. A significant portion of each sale will be donated to World Central Kitchen, an organization that is directly supporting refugees of the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Curated by the Arts + Crafts Research Studio.

Participating artists include Kelly Chang, Julien Gardair, Aya Natalia Karpińska, Hee Chan Kim, Sam Linguist, Andrew Cornell Robinson, Russ Spitkovsky, Frederic Tuten, Miguel Villalobos, and Integrated Makers Collab (a ceramic sculptural collaboration between thirty-two students of Parsons School of Design and the Arts & Crafts Research Studio). Lucas Benoit, Melanie Calabrese, Cindy Cao, Saumya Choksey, Jacqueline Clayton, Janay Davison, Cece Deming-Bernstein, Marcello Flutie, Zoe Frangos, Joshua Frizell, Carlo Hatke, Ellis Herz, Aryan Jaglan, Weston Kear, Yasemin Kurttepeli, Xingtao Liu, Jorge Lopez-Doria, Amanda Lugo, Thomas Mathieu, Presley Nguyen, Mateus O'Donnell, Henry Pakenham, Katie Parsons, Aidan Reinhold, Ahana Sharma, Quincy Sileo, Chloe Trachtenberg, Edmund Trang, Shelby Tse, Ciara Gabrielle Uysipuo, Defne Uzelli, Jiayi Wang.

This exhibition coincides with the 25th edition of The Clemente Open Studios

The Clemente Soto Velez Cultural & Educational Center, Artists Alliance Inc., and the Clemente Residents are pleased to announce the 25th edition of The Clemente Open Studios on Saturday, May 21 from 4-8p and Sunday, May 22, 2022 from 2-6p. 

Housing more than 46 visual artists’ studios and 11 visual and performing arts organizations, the Clemente community is thrilled to welcome friends, colleagues, and neighbors back into their home on the Lower East Side. The public is invited to explore this multigenerational community of artists, some of whom have lived and worked in the neighborhood for more than two decades, and residents of participating residency programs. All events are FREE and open to the public. See the press release for a complete schedule of performances, events, and a guide to artist studios and exhibitions.

Related Links

Class: Reimagining Tableware as a Sculptural Landscape


Reimagining Tableware as a Sculptural Landscape

Changing attitudes and emerging social behaviors in food preparation and the social and cultural rituals of eating have lead to changes in the way tableware is made and used. In this short course we will explore historical and contemporary forms of table ware design. Through lectures, class discussion, research and making through drawing, modeling and prototyping in clay we will consider new categories of tableware and new roles for familiar as well as sculptural pieces. If you’re wondering what are the most appropriate forms and designs to use in your work, you’ll gain a better understanding of what’s current and gain an appreciation of the challenges and opportunities makers confront in their creative practice.

Tuesdays July 07 through August 25, 2020. 11:00 AM-1:00 PM EST
Level:  Intermediate / Advanced
Space is limited

Register online at Greenwich House Pottery

In this workshop I will focus on paper templates, slab, coil, and pinched forms used to make everything from plates and bowls to mugs and handles. We will discuss shapes as well as approaches to design, ranging from the practical and ergonomic to the poetic, and playful. 

For this workshop, you will need a computer with Zoom. Students are welcome to act upon the project prompts and try the techniques with me as we progress from week to week. I have found its best to use the class time on zoom to sit back and take notes. The sessions will be recorded and sent to students for future reference. I’m excited to invite you into my studio to share craft strategies and answer questions about the process of making. I will send an email with a Zoom link with details to registered students before the Tuesday workshops. 

This series of workshops requires a few tools. This list of suggested tools is not required for the workshop but may help when you try it on your own. 

  • Clay
  • Banding wheel
  • Scoring tool (a fork will do) 
  • Sharp knife 
  • Metal or rubber rib 
  • Small container for water 
  • Paintbrush 
  • Rolling Pin 
  • A bat or board 
  • Paper for templates (Tarpaper also known as “roofing felt” can be found at any hardware home center. Typical grades are 15 lb. and 30 lb. weight, which indicates the thickness. I like to use the sturdier 30 lb. grade for making templates for large forms.)
  • Utility Knife and/or Scissors
  • Cutting Surface (you can use a board or a self-healing cutting matt) 
  • Pencils 
  • Tape 
  • Sketchbook

Exhibition: Food Show

FOOD SHOW March 4th, 2020 — March 29th, 2020 Opening Reception: Wednesday, March 4th, 6pm-8pm 131 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002 Gallery Hours: Thursday-Sunday 1pm-8pm

Learn More

SFA Projects is proud to present FOOD SHOW, a group exhibition curated by Chantal Lee and Jeffrey Morabito. FOOD SHOW explores the relationship between people and food as it exists in the cultural imagination. The exhibition looks at how food participates as a subject today, capable of expressing personal history, cultural mythology, and collective experience; describing a still-fertile ground for the tradition of still-life. Artists include Izzy Barber, Jon Chonko, Jennifer Coates, Martin Dull, Paul Gagner, Judy Glantzman, Alex Kanevsky, Maria Liebana, Jeffrey Morabito, Joshua Nierodzinski, Aoife Pacheco, Andrew Cornell Robinson, Ivan Lamberts Samuels and Crys Yin.

Jamón Jamón II (Reliquary Loisada)2019, Slipcast ceramic, enlay and silkscreened underglaze transfer with glazed interior 16 x 7 x 7 inches.

Andrew Cornell Robinson, Jamón Jamón II (Reliquary Loisada), 2019

Since ancient times, food has measured human well-being. Across cultures, families sat down communally to eat food that corresponded with the changing seasons and that were harvested or hunted by themselves or their neighbors. What was once a slow interaction with food has been replaced by a ménage of seasons, sourced from near and distant landscapes, moving through us at the speed of light. Our food experiences today are largely brought to us anonymously by corporations that mobilize the gentrification of our homes, the food market, and with what we eat and how. Nevertheless, food has endured as a symbol of experience. Whether it is the forbidden fruit on the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, the apple indicating immoral indulgence of pleasure. Or Wong Kar Wai’s repeating scenes of noodle stalls in In the Mood for Love, motifs suggesting loneliness and longing. Or the Greek mythological figure of Tantalus, who is punished to forever go thirsty and hungry, despite standing in a pool of water and almost within reach of a fruit tree (the origin of the word “tantalize”). In art, food has been used as a symbol to express not only our relationships to one another, but our human nature, exposing our dreams and fears, and giving voice to our desires. FOOD SHOW is equally inspired by more recent food experiences in art and culture, particularly Gordon Matta Clark’s artist-run restaurant, FOOD, from SoHo in the 1970s; and the installation works of Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija. For FOOD, artists such as Donald Judd, Robert Rauschenberg, Philip Glass, and John Cage created meals, washed dishes, and ate at the restaurant, serving to other artist-diners who met to discuss art. The cooking and food were seen as both a performance art and a visual art, with the food “painting” the table. As well, Rirkrit Tiravanija’s works are fundamentally about bringing people together, and so created site-specific structured spaces where he cooked and served food to his gallery visitors.

Jamón Jamón II (Reliquary Loisada)2019, Slipcast ceramic, enlay and silkscreened underglaze transfer with glazed interior 16 x 7 x 7 inches.

Queer + Peculiar Craft, Making Identity

The exhibition, Queer and Peculiar Craft presents an intersectional group of artists each of whom have an uncanny visual language composed of cast-off histories and unexpected applications of craft materials. Koren Christofides, Greg Climer, Roxanne Jackson, Brian Kenny, Edmund Green Langdell, Phoenix Lindsey-Hall, Vick Quezada, Andrew Cornell Robinson, Timo Rissanen, Juana Valdes, and Lu Zhang.
Many of the liberating impulses since 1968 have led to significant changes in the way our society defines itself. There is now a much greater consciousness of the world’s multiculturalism and an understanding that not every person aspires to a utopian modernist model of progress that the West once believed to be an unquestioned absolute. A contemporary outgrowth of this shift is evidenced in the revival of craft materials and the ways that the crafts have opened up from material centered disciplines to idea infused functional, aesthetic, and conceptual creative strategies. The makers in this exhibition employ strategies in order to give voice to their search for personal and cultural identity in contrast to imposed standards of normalcy, which often deprive people of affirmative images so that they may not see themselves as actors in their own biography and society. Yet when these new voices, and visual languages push the boundaries of an accepted norm, they are seen as other, as strange, queer and peculiar.

According to the historian David J. Getsy, to nominate something as “queer” is to cast aspersion on it as being unnatural, incorrect, wrong, or abnormal. Anything called “queer” is looked at with suspicion and intensified scrutiny... As the most visible and mobile manifestation of the policing of the boundaries of the “normal,” the “natural,” and “common” sense, the label “queer” was historically used to tyrannize those who loved, desired, or lived differently. When lesbian, gay, and bisexual activists and thinkers rejected the presumption that they should assimilate and aspire to be merely tolerated, they embraced “queer” as a rallying cry. They upheld as a virtue their failure to fit into the normal. While the label “queer” is often associated with people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and/or gender non conforming, the concept in the context of the makers featured in this exhibition is intersectional in that they explore a multitude of identities, ideas and craft traditions by creating works that may appear peculiar looking, feeling or functioning in their explorations of craft materials as well as topics that range from feminism, gender identity, queer visibility, ethnicity, immigration, sexuality, history, and politics.

The implication of queer peculiarity applied to the construction of otherness offers a simultaneous burden and an opportunity for each of these artists who come to their work with unique lived experiences and perspectives. The immigrant experience offers one way of seeing society through the lens of belonging or not. Juana Valdes explores her lived experiences and observations about migration as a complex process, constructing history through a continuum that involves the personal journey of the Afro-Cuban diasporic community into a new homeland. Her work examines craft materials and methods and in several of her works, she traces the post-colonial history of the Americas and the intercontinental trade in people and porcelain. Lu Zhang is an artist, born in Xian, China, who lives and works in New York. Her ceramic constructions of computers and tablets explore her sense of living between cultures. The roughly modeled ceramic rendering of video chats with her family in China reflect the experience of being in two cultures at once, but not quite fitting into either. 

Artists Koren Christofides, and Roxanne Jackson explore ideas of female power with a sense of humor and fantastic forms modeled and manipulated out of clay and other media. Their creative explorations often touch upon human nature as seen through the lens of magic, mythology, and proverbs about women.

Greg Climer’s series of quilts inverts the traditional methods for quilt construction by creating the fabric fragments rather than upcycling scraps. He has been working with digital tools to compose larger abstractions of intimate, poignant and sometimes transgressive portraits of queer people. Fashion designer Edmund Green Langdell is creating a platform that seeks to uplift the health and wellbeing of transgender people through the creation of hand made crochet or needle felted packers designed to affirm the silhouette in apparel for transgedner people. Brian Kenny’s multidisciplinary works explore autobiographical themes of his queer identity, shifting societal perceptions about gender, sexuality and politics. His banners are composed of a patchwork of sports jerseys and vinyl advertisements pieced together to celebrate exuberant expressions of the masculine queer gaze. Timo Rissanen explores craft through cross-stiched poetry, and memory resulting in works that reflect upon his lived experiences of discrimination as a gay man as well as celebrations of desire and reflections upon the objectified body.

Vick Quezada’s projects explore the material histories and consciousness of Indigenous- Latinx hybridity within Western culture. They use a variety of media, and performances embodying ancient Nahuan rites to simultaneously make the obscured visible. Their work in this exhibition uses smoke-fired terracotta to create a series of prison cafeteria trays, reflecting upon the humble platform for countless shared meals of millions of imprisoned people. Their artifacts, delineate inherent systems of power and subjectivity in the Americas, while transgressing “official” historical accounts. 

Most queer people face the daily challenge of being their authentic self in societies that often are indifferent or openly hostile to them. In response to notions of visibility Andrew Cornell Robinson’s ceramic and mixed media sculptures explore historical customs as a metaphor for queer-baiting and conformity. His Jamon Jamon series is inspired by the medieval Spanish tradition of offering ham to house guests. This customary form of hospitality may seem commonplace today, but its historical roots come from a desire to sniff out heresy during the inquisition when the pious were looking for expressions of distaste in response to the offer of sliced pork. His use of butchered cuts of ham serve as a metaphor about being “suspected”, and “queer-baited” as a gay man. The sculptures are modeled, cast, and camouflaged with inlaid surface glazes, printed images and hidden messages. 

Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s work centers around violence, loss and memory. Phoenix uses porcelain and stoneware to create sculptures that are based on extensive historical research about violence, hate crimes, and queer histories. Her unique explorations of events and artifacts focus on members of queer communities. Some examples include her porcelain casts of weapons used in hate-crimes, and others include artifacts that serve as evidence of queer lives lived. “I have discovered that the everyday objects that are left behind create an instant memorial.” The works included in this queer and peculiar exhibition ask how we might imagine, make, live and see differently. 

The Clemente Abrazo Interno Gallery 107 Suffolk Street, New York, NY 10002. www.theclementecenter.org
Dec 5, 2019 through Jan 18, 2020. On view Wed - Sun 12-7pm.

For more info contact info@acrstudio.com

Queer + Peculiar Craft is curated by Fred Frelinghuysen Presents and Andrew C. Robinson. 
Support for this exhibition is provided by The Clemente, and the Arts + Crafts Research Studio.   

Jamón Jamón IV (Newark) Glazed ceramic, rubber, charcoal, graphite, acrylic, silkscreen prints on paper, metal, magnets 24 x 10 x 12 inches, 2019, by Andrew Cornell Robinson